Legal Alerts

NLRB Notice Posting Rule Delayed Indefinitely

04.01.12

On April 17, 2012, the D.C. Circuit issued an injunction delaying the effective date of the NLRB's Final Rule requiring most employers to post a notice of employee rights in their workplaces. The Final Rule, previously scheduled to take effect on April 30, 2012, has now been postponed indefinitely due to conflicting opinions issued by federal district courts.

The United States District Court for the District of Columbia issued a ruling on March 2, 2012 that upheld the NLRB's authority to enact the Final Rule but invalidated the primary enforcement mechanisms. On April 13, 2012, the U.S. District Court for the District of South Carolina struck down the Final Rule in its entirety in Chamber of Commerce v. NLRB, No. 2:11-cv-02516-DCN. The judge held that by enacting the Final Rule, the NLRB exceeded its statutory authority in violation of the Administrative Procedure Act.

As a result of the conflicting opinions, the D.C. Circuit enjoined the enforcement of the Final Rule pending appeal. NLRB Chairman Mark Gaston Pearce expressed the Board's opposition to the order but confirmed that all regional offices have been directed to comply with the injunction.

Contact
LaFromboise, Antoine J.
Communications and Brand Manager
T 612.371.3269

Search Tips:

You may use the wildcard symbol (*) as a root expander.  A search for "anti*" will find not only "anti", but also "anti-trust", "antique", etc.

Entering two terms together in a search field will behave as though an "OR" is being used.  For example, entering "Antique Motorcars" as a Client Name search will find results with either word in the Client Name.

Operators

AND and OR may be used in a search.  Note: they must be capitalized, e.g., "Project AND Finance." 

The + and - sign operators may be used.  The + sign indicates that the term immediately following is required, while the - sign indicates to omit results that contain that term. E.g., "+real -estate" says results must have "real" but not "estate".

To perform an exact phrase search, surround your search phrase with quotation marks.  For example, "Project Finance".

Searches are not case sensitive.